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Armoured reserves

21 Mar
Armoured reserves

With another cardboard tank sitting on my desk thanks to the tutorial, I decided to still paint it even though it has no place in my 250pts. single game list.

This way I can still use it as a replacement for the duck of doom or expand my kill team during a campaign. Also the unit needs a minimum of three tanks when played in 40k, so my grots are now also playable with GW’s own kill team rules instead of just the Heralds of Ruin variant (which is still way more fun^^).

As the paint job is kind of straightforward (same as the other two tanks you already know), I use this post to show how the tank was painted. Unfortunately I came up with that idea AFTER finishing the model, so there are no step-by-step pictures, just the finished product at the end. 😀

Used colours

  • Citadel Paints
    • Agrax Earthshade
    • Blood Red (Evil Sunz Scarlet)
    • Boltgun Metal (Leadbelcher)
    • Chaos Black primer
    • Codex Grey (Dawnstone)
    • Nuln Oil
    • Rhinox Hide
    • Runefang Steel
    • Snot Green (Warpstone Glow)
  • Vallejo Game Color
    • Brassy Brass
    • Glorious Gold
    • Heavy Blackgreen
    • Scarlett Red
    • White Primer

Basecoating

I used the notorious Chaos Black spray primer to start the tank, because the spray isn’t as moist as using regular paint and a brush (and it’s way faster^^). I haven’t had problems yet, but some cardboard types tend to warp when exposed to even medium amounts of water, so I just stay on the safe side here.

Red armour

  • Base the entire armour plates with several watered-down coats of Scarlett Red until the tank looks fast enough. 😉
  • Use Agrax Earthshade to blackline the armour plates and all the rivets. You may do this twice in the deeper recesses to add even more plasticity to the model.
  • Give the whole armour a heavy drybrush with Blood Red.

Sponge chipping

  • Use a sponge to add splashes of Rhinox Hide to the armour. Both edges and big scarcely detailed plates are your target here.
  • Add splashes of Runefang Steel wherever you applied the Rhinox Hide before to represent chipped paint. This will disguise the missing details compared to a plastic model and adds a lot of character.

Rivets

  • Simply paint them with Boltgun Metal to let them pop out. You can add a wash and a highlight with Runefang Steel, but I found that to be unnecessary to be satisfied. 😀

Metal parts

  • Base all metal parts with Boltgun Metal.
  • Wash them first with Nuln Oil, then with Agrax Earthshade..
  • Drybrush all the parts with Runefang Steel.

Brass parts

  • Pick out some metal parts you want to give more focus and base the with Brassy Brass to break up the rather dull metal colours.
  • Give them a heavy wash with Agrax Earthshade.
  • Drybrush with Glorious Gold.
  • Pick out the edges with Runefang Steel.

Orky glyphs

  • Base all glyphs with Codex Grey.
  • Highlight them with a 1:1 mix of Codex Grey and White Primer.
  • Highlight with White Primer.

Cables & glass

  • Put some Heavy Blackgreen on your wet palette and prime all green parts.
  • Mix a bit of Snot Green into the Blackgreen and highlight the parts.
  • Repeat the last step until you reach pure Snot Green for the last highlight.

The paint job is more quick&dirty than highly sophisticated, but it’s sufficient for a “tabletop standard” model and gritty enough for the grots.

I would love to make a lot more of these tanks just to field a thousand points of them in a regular 40k game and win while my opponent is still laughing. 😀

Unfortunately the cardboard method may be really cheap, but it is also time-consuming as hell. Therefore I will explore the means of making masters for 3 turrets, 3 chassis and 3 kinds of tracks and just cast them in resin. This would allow me up to 27 different tank configurations, save a lot of time and even makes them sellable. If this concept proves efficient enough, expect some scrap tank fleets in the mid future. 🙂

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2 Comments

Posted by on 21. March 2017 in Heralds of Ruin, Tutorial, Warhammer 40k

 

Tags: , ,

2 responses to “Armoured reserves

  1. patrickwr

    22. March 2017 at 01:00

    Dang, these look fantastic! Great work, very inspiring.

     
    • Krimdar

      22. March 2017 at 01:07

      Thanks a lot. 🙂

       

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